Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

A Day at Iguazú Falls, Argentina (with Videos!)

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

Yesterday I wrote about the first leg of my recent South America trip, which I spent in Buenos Aires. From there, flying out of the city’s domestic airport, I traveled to Puerto Iguazú to spend a couple of nights at The Iguazú Grand and to visit Iguazú Falls. I admit I haven’t seen a ton of waterfalls in my life, with the exception of Niagara, Gullfoss, Blackwater, and the roadside variety that form in the mountains of West Virginia after a good rain or snow melt. I knew that Iguazú  Falls were going to be big, but nothing could have prepared me for what I saw when I arrived.

If you’ve never been to Iguazú, there are multiple trail circuits, including an Upper, Lower, and Devil’s Throat circuit, that take visitors to different parts of the falls (visitors reach the trails via train; good maps here and here). We got to the park early, before the gates opened and when crowds aren’t quite so bad, advice from our guide that I highly recommend taking. Our first destination was Devil’s Throat, accessed via the most remote of the park’s trails. Reaching Devil’s Throat is an experience unto itself, as it requires walking more than a kilometer along a metal catwalk that snakes along atop the upper Iguazú River. (The experience is made all the more dramatic when you make the journey in monsoon-like conditions, complete with thunder and lightning, like we did. Still, it was fun.) At 262 feet high, Devil’s Throat is the tallest of Iguazú’s 275 falls. (That makes it almost twice as tall as Niagara.) Figures vary, but on average, 1,500 cubic meters of water flows over the falls and into the Iguazú River below every second, but that volume can climb to 13,000 cubic meters of water per second in wetter, rainier times, which are typically between November and March. The falls were nice and full when we arrived, and a thick, heavy mist added an extra dose of drama to the gray day.

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
IMG_9947 (1)

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

From Devil’s Throat, we moved on to the Upper Circuit, walking along the top of the falls and looking out over the Iguazú River, over to Brazil on the other side. The views of the falls from here were my favorite because you can stand, quite literally, on top of the falls and watch the water drop toward the earth right below your feet. One important thing to note about visiting the falls is that you can stay on the Brazilian side or the Argentinian side. If you’re a U.S. passport holder, entering Brazil will require an additional tourist visa, which isn’t needed for travel to Argentina. If you stay on the Brazil side (check out the Belmond), you’ll get the best uninterrupted panoramic views of the falls, but if you stay on the Argentina side, you’ll get to walk along them and experience them close-up, like we did. I highly recommend staying on the Argentina side.

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

Next, we took the Lower Circuit down to the bottom of the falls…

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

We ended our visit by walking along the river to board a boat that would take us right into the bottom of the falls. The ride was thrilling, and we got soaked, but it was worthwhile to have another perspective of the falls. Our boat ride ended with a leisurely cruise down the river, with Argentina to our left and Brazil to our right, and an incredible day at the mighty Iguazú Falls behind us.

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out
Iguazú Falls, Argentina | Day In / Day Out

Have you been to Iguazú Falls? I’d love to hear about it—if you went during a dry time, a wet time, and if you took the boat ride into the falls. If you haven’t been to Iguazú, I can’t recommend it enough!

11 thoughts on “A Day at Iguazú Falls, Argentina (with Videos!)

  1. WOW those are awesome but at the same time a little scary!

    On Sun, Jan 24, 2016 at 10:27 AM, Day In / Day Out wrote:

    > Day In / Day Out posted: ” Yesterday I wrote about the first leg of my > recent South America trip, which I spent in Buenos Aires. From there, > flying out of the city’s domestic airport, I traveled to Puerto Iguazú to > spend a couple of nights at The Iguazú Grand and to visit Iguaz” >

    Like

  2. Went last year and blogged about it too. Went to both sides and took the helicopter trip over the falls on the Brazilian side. They are surely one of the most spectacular sights on the planet.
    Brazilian side is higher and has better panoramas. Spent two days on Argentinian side where, like you, I was staying.
    Loved your photos. Dramatic under thundery skies. It was sunny when I was there and there were rainbows everywhere. I have so many photos of rainbows…

    Like

    1. There are so many options, aren’t there? Did you stay on the Brazilian side, too, or just cross over for a helicopter tour? I’ve heard and read that heli tours are only offered on the Brazil side. (In a perfect world, we could stay on both sides for a couple nights.) I would’ve loved to see the falls from Brazil, but alas, didn’t have the required visa to enter the country. And initially, I was pretty bummed about the weather we had, but I ended up thinking that it added a lot of mood and drama to the day. Still, I imagine the blue skies and rainbows were just a tad magical!

      Like

      1. Hey,
        I was able to visit both sides, although I stayed in Argentina. As I’m Irish it only takes about three minutes to cross the border in a taxi and I don’t pay any visa fees. I’m attaching a link to my post on Iguassu in Brazil- lots of rainbows as you will see. There is also a link to my Facebook photo album with even more pictures on the Brazilian side.

        Don’t be bummed about the weather. I loved your photos- so dramatic with all that water. If anything, posts like yours make me dream about returning because I’m sure I’ll see another aspect of the falls when I go back.

        http://unlatinoverde.com/south-america/argentina/las-cataratas-del-iguazu/iguacu-brazil/

        Like

      2. You got some really stunning, clear shots! The clouds and rain and mist on our visit made it really tricky to get clear photos. When we were standing at Devil’s Throat, I don’t remember seeing any trails on the Brazil side across the river, so it’s nice to see it from your POV on that side. Hope you get to go back again!

        Liked by 1 person

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